Owl Point and Hoyt Arboretum, OR (18-45)

Owl and Alki Points and the Rockpile from Vista Ridge   October 12, 2018

This was our first hike on the Owl Point trail, which follows the northern edge of Vista Ridge and leads to views of the north side of Mt Hood and the Clear Branch valley below. Much of the lower elevation landscape was burned by the Dollar Lake Fire in 2011.

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The first views from the 0.3 mile trail junction display the luminous seed heads of abundant fireweed at the edge of the burn zone.

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Pearly everlasting and fireweed

The trail leads along the ridge, mostly through forest with a few viewpoint and meadow openings.

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A meadow

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Fungus along the trail

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Beargrass and huckleberry

The first major viewpoint along the trail is called The Rockpile:

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Approaching The Rockpile

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Dan at The Rockpile

We went on a short way to Owl Point where we had lunch and signed in at the trail register.

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Owl Point

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Dan at Owl Point

The next views are a panorama from northeast to south:

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Upper Hood RIver valley in the distance

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Laurance Lake

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Continuing south – Clear Branch Valley

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Lower flanks of Mt Hood and the Dollar Lake burn

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Mt Hood

Leaving Owl Point:

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Finally we went on to Alki Point which let us look north into Washington on this brilliant blue day.

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Alki Point – first Mt Rainier (behind Mt Defiance) and Mt Adams come into view.

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Farther out on the point, we can also see Mt St Helens.

On our return, we stopped at the 0.8 mile overlook with a better sun angle. The one yellow tree, possibly a larch, stood out in front of The Pinnacle in the grey foothills leading up to the mountain.

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Barrett Spur in front of Mt Hood

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Coe Glacier close up

We enjoyed this trail for great views of Mt Hood from a new aspect.

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Huckleberry foliage

5.4 miles. 800 feet.  (#56)

Hoyt Arboretum   October 14, 2018

We also took a three mile wander with our son along trails in Hoyt Arboretum in the west hills of Portland to see the fall colors. (#57)

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Aralia with birds eating the berries:

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Sassafras

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CRAFTING

I finished the Fiore Washcloth.

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Steigerwald Lake, WA (18-44)

Steigerwald National Wildlife Refuge    10-7-2018

Rainy weekend. We were too early for the migrating birds, but saw foggy cliffs across the Columbia River, a few waterbirds and reflections in Gibbons Creek and Redtail Lake, late season flowers, berries and a few fall colors.   (hike#55)  4.4 miles

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Late lupine, berries, fog on the cliffs across the river.

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I always appreciate the welcoming path entrance.

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Water birds on Gibbons Creek

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Views of Vancouver Point and Reed Island from the dike path.

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The door to the art trail is closed for winter nesting season. Time for the birds to come home.

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Fish ladder

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We walked to the end of the refuge.

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Sand bars between Reed Island and the Washington shore.

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Vista House under the fog on the Oregon cliffs.

On our return walk we saw a few more birds.

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Snowy egret across the channel

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We learned from a trail steward that the refuge is planning to breach the dikes to the Columbia River to reestablish the natural flood plains and wildlife habitat, beginning sometime next year.

Knitting

I finished another round dish cloth.

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I started knitting a Fiore washcloth. I learned the picot cast on, and I am relearning stranded knitting and catching floats for this project.

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Garden

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Zinnias and peppers

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Sumac

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NE Portland changing colors. View from a walk up Alameda Ridge.

Through Dartmore to Fowey – May 2, 2018 (18-43)

Day 7 – Road Day – Through Dartmoor to Fowey

Happy Birthday Dan! We had his celebratory birthday dinner the previous evening in Lyme Regis. We were as close as we may ever get to the Isle of Wight, he does not seem to be losing his hair, and we were very glad to be sharing this wonderful adventure. Onward to Cornwall, where Dan had planned several hiking adventures for us.

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Dartmoor National Park

We chose a slightly roundabout way to Fowey by driving through Dartmoor National Park. The moors are broad uplands bisected by river valleys. Rocky ‘Tors‘ cap the high points, and much of the landscape is divided by walled and treed hedgerows. Most of the land has or is being grazed and/or farmed at some point in history. This is not a USA style National Park, with wilderness and limited access. There are roads, villages, farms and livestock as well as walking paths (hiking trails). The land is being conserved in partnership with the farmers.

Our road wound up and onto the moors. We reached a parking area at what seemed to be the top of the moor and stopped to look around. There was a trail heading off to the nearby Tor – Mel Tor. We walked along the hedgerows, around the sheep and cow enclosures, and up a path to the top of the rocky promontory.  From the summit we could see moorland in every direction, and the River Dart to the south.

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View across Dartmore

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Nearby Bel Tor

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Our path to Mel Tor – sheep ahead

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Another sheep

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Up the hill

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Mel Tor

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Birthday boy at the top

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Views across Dartmore

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The River Dart below

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Another view on the way down

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Looking back to Mel Tor

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Another sheep

We continued our drive west, over the moors, planning to stop at the National Park Visitor Centre at Princetown for more information about the park.  But first we had to drive through a herd of wild Dartmoor wild ponies? Apparently they range freely over the moors, and we were lucky to see them before we knew that we should look for them.

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We stopped in Princetown for lunch and a visit to the National Park Visitor Centre.

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Sherlock Holmes tableau in the Visitor Centre

We stopped again at a picturesque viewpoint over the moor before leaving the National Park. The landscape reminds me of  the Land of Counterpane illustration from my childhood copy of the Robert Louis Stevenson book A Child’s Garden of Verses. I keep looking for that edition in used book stores but have yet to find it. The boy’s patchwork bedquilt was transformed to a land of hedgerows and fields, similar to my view here, and nothing like I see anywhere in the US. I think my love for British literature makes all the typical British scenes seem so magical to me. The western US is much different – dryer, wilder, more expansive, beautiful, but not ‘British’.

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Land of counterpane

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Hedgerow

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Gorse

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Our rental car

In Saltash we bought groceries for four days of home cooking at our self catering cottage in Fowey.

Fowey

Fowey is a Cornish village that is draped down the cliffs above the harbor on the estuary of the River Fowey. Our rented cottage was in a row of dwellings about a quarter mile above the harbor, not too far from the community carpark. The streets and lanes are very narrow and steep, and individual homes do not necessarily have car parking. We were able to park in a construction zone long enough to offload our luggage and groceries, then moved our car to the carpark and walked back down the hill via the scenic route, to the cottage.

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Narrow lane down to the harbor

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Upstream view of the River Fowey

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View across the estuary to where we would walk tomorrow

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Polruan, across the river

We walked all the way down to the harbor

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Upstream view from the quay

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Downstream toward the mouth of the River Fowey

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Local history

We walked past this church

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and around the maze of buildings and lanes, trying to get a feel for the locale. We were glad to have prepurchased our groceries – there were restaurants and Cornish pasty shops aplenty but I did not see any grocery stores. We enjoy eating out while traveling, but after a few days we miss our own cooking –  simpler, cheaper and healthier. We returned to our cottage for the evening.

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Our cottage

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View from the window

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Local artwork  depicting Fowey Harbor in our cottage

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Falls Creek Falls (18-42)

Falls Creek Falls Trail, Gifford Pinchot National Forest, WA     9/29/2018    (#54)

This trail provides fall foliage along Falls Creek, and an impressive waterfall at the terminus.

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Colorful vine maples at the trailhead

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Into the woods

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Over the first bridge

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Along the creek

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Over the upper bridge

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Around this turn we hear the falls

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Then look up and see the upper falls

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Middle and lower tiers (about 225 feet high) of Falls Creek Falls viewed from the end of the trail.

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Lower plunge pool

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Downstream view

After eating our lunch, we returned back down the trail,

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Through the vine maple corridor

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Under the big leaf maple canopy

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With a pause by the stream

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And another pause near the trailhead to play with the impressionistic reflections…

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We saw a variety of leaf displays…

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Vine maple – green

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Vine maple – turning orange

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Vine maple – orange

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Solomon seal, with berries

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Vine maple – red

My new identification for the day was Pacific dogwood without the distinctive white flowers. In the fall it has red leaves and red seed pod clusters.

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About 4 miles round trip and 800 feet.

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CRAFTING

I have made knitting progress on my Ivy Lace Cardigan and a round dishcloth.

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Fall Equinox, Indian Heaven, WA (18-41)

East Crater Trail, 9/23/18 (Hike #53)

Indian Heaven is a landscape of lakes, cinder cones, forests and meadows in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest southwest of Mt Adams. The Pacific Crest Trail runs right through the center of the Wilderness on its northward path through southern Washington state. There are abundant wild huckleberries in late summer. By fall, the huckleberry and other foliage display a vibrant spectrum of bright colors – reds, oranges, fuchsias, magentas, yellows, yellow oranges and yellow greens that stand out in sharp contrast to the forest and lake greens and browns, and the sky blue.

Last fall the Indian Heaven Wilderness was closed due to the East Crater Fire that occurred at the same time as the Eagle Creek Fire, so we are back this year after a 2 year absence.

Today we hiked the East Crater Trail to Junction Lake in the center of the wilderness area, then completed a loop that passed several lakes and followed the Pacific Crest Trail back south to Junction Lake.

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Red huckleberry bushes in the forest

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Layers of color

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Unnamed lake just east of East Crater – the burn from last year seen beyond and above.

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Top of East Crater

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Junction Lake

So much color in the meadows!

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Ripe huckleberries

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Amanita

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Dropping down to Lemei Lake where we had our lunch:

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Lunch view

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The southbound section of the Pacific Crest trail was more forested, with views through the trees of a couple of bigger lakes.

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Bear Lake

We passed Junction Lake again, then hiked back to the trailhead.

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Huckleberry and spirea

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Mountain Ash

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Huckleberry stump

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The last little lake on the trail out.

Our total for the day:  9.6 miles/1000 feet elevation.

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Panther Creek Falls

We made a quick stop on our drive home at this massive waterfall complex – there are three creeks that tumble together into the main branch of Panther Creek.

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Quilting

I went to the Northwest Quilt Expo in Portland and purchased some fabric for my next quilt project:

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Late Summer Adventures Part 3 – Three Sisters, Oregon (18-40)

Rest Day    9-14-2018   Whychus River Overlook

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I slowly walked the easy one mile loop (#51) and contemplated distant views of mountains and close up views of the high desert forest. My legs were not up for much more today. Dan hiked down to the river and wandered there for a bit.

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Nearly flat trail through the Ponderosa forest

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Looking down to Whychus Creek

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Middle and North Sisters

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Mt Washington, Pole Creek Fire forest

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Rabbit brush

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Manzanita

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Manzanita bark

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Manzanita leaves

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“Little apples”

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Ponderosa

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Sage

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Sky

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Whychus Creek recovery team logo

 

Back in town I visited The Stitchin’ Post, a wonderful quilt store.

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Window display

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Window display

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I bought a small package of Australian-themed fabric.

On a related note, we enjoyed having a Double Wedding Ring quilt on the bed in our lodge room.

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Tam McArthur Rim    9-15-2018     (#52)

This trail provides another entrance point to the Three Sisters Wilderness, from the east toward Tam McArthur Rim along a ridge that leads toward Broken Top. We had hiked this trail in September two years ago on a clear day. Today we watched clouds cover the peaks, lifting occasionally for views. By the time we reached the top, a bitter wind was beginning to blow and the cloud cover was increasing. We didn’t stay long.

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Tam McArthur Rim and Three Creek Lake as seen from the trail

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Broken Top appears as we cross the upper plain

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Almost to the top, with Little Three Creek Lake below

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Middle and North Sisters from the End of Trail overlook

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Broken Top and South Sister from the overlook

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Closer view of the glaciers on Middle and North Sister

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All three Sisters, with clouds

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North view beyond Tam McArthur overlook. Pole Creek fire burn zone in the foreground; Black Butte beyond.

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Late blooming lupine

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Neon lichen

Lookback to our hike in September of 2016 to compare the views:

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Middle and North Sisters, September 2018

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In September 2016, on a clear day

We hiked about 5.5 miles/ 1200 feet today.

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Back to Dee Wright/Mckenzie Pass at sunset

We took our last opportunity this year to spend a little time at the lava lands of Mckenzie Pass – and one of my favorite places in the world. Despite the cold wind we wanted to see the sunset. The Sisters were still covered in clouds, but as the lowering sun streamed in from under the western clouds, Black Crater lit up a bright, ethereal red orange that seemed magical. To the west, the streaky clouds glowed pink and gold.

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Lenticular cloud over Mt Washington

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Black Crater at 7:01 pm

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Black Crater at 7:04 pm

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Clouds continue to hide North and Middle Sisters

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What North and Middle Sisters look like – from September 2016

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Sunset colors to the west

A fitting end to our late summer adventures – back to Portland tomorrow.

 

 

Late Summer Adventures, Part 2 – Crater Lake and the Obsidian Trail (18-39)

Crater Lake 9/12/2018

We left Boardman to drive to Sisters, Oregon for another few days of hiking. The webcams at Crater Lake National Park showed the smoke haze had mostly lifted, so we added a side trip to see Crater Lake.

We had been to Crater Lake about 20 years ago, but our visit that summer was early in the season and there was too much snow to do much more than admire the view from the one small area that was accessible. It has been a goal to return and hike down to the lake, take the boat to Wizard Island, and hike to the many viewpoints around the lake. We were foiled again this year by the extremely bad air quality that was present during the time we had planned, but at least we got to see the views on a nearly clear day and admire the absolutely blue water.

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Discovery Point – first view of the lake and a sign showing what Mt Mazama looked like before the eruption and collapse that created Crater Lake.

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Close view of Llao Rock; Mt Thielson in the distance.

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Wizard Island

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South view to Garfield Peak

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Wizard Island and Mt Scott beyond

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Crater at the top of Wizard Island

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The tropical blue water in the shallows around Wizard Island

Obsidian Trail 9/13/2018

We have stayed in Sisters, Oregon several times, but have yet to explore all of the trails in the area. This was our first time to hike in the Obsidian Area of the Three Sisters Wilderness (#50) (12 miles, 2000 feet).

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The first few miles are through forest, including part of the 2017 Milli Fire burn zone.

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Obsidian trail

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Bear Grass and huckleberry foliage

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Sims Butte through the Milli burn zone

At about 3.5 miles, the trail ascends over and through a lava flow, with views to the Obsidian Cliff and to North and Middle Sisters – though today the Sisters were hiding in clouds.

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Trail up the lava flow

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Obsidian Cliff with burned forest above

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Trail through the flow

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White Branch Creek on the other side

The trail continues up through forest, meadows and past interesting rock formations.

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Middle Sister in the clouds

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Late summer pasque flower meadow with Obsidian Cliffs beyond

Next we reached Obsidian Falls.

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Beyond the falls is a high basin with a spring and a pond between a craggy cliff and an Obsidian flow.

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A bubbling spring at the base of the cliff

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Another spring

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A pond

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Dan photographing the Obsidian flow

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Obsidian flow

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Closer view of the obsidian

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obsidian

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conchoidal fracture

Over the dividing ridge is another pond.

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We continued around the loop to cloud obscured views of North and Middle Sister, a good view of the Little Brother, and a view down to Glacier Creek.

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The Little Brother

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Glacier Creek, cloud obscured Sisters

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The Little Brother

The trail descends to Sunshine Meadow along White Branch Creek.

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Mt Washington and the Belknap Craters from the trail

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Huckleberry lined path to Sunshine Meadow

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The last magenta paintbrush in Sunshine Meadow

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and an obscured view of the Sisters

We continued down the Glacial Way, back over the lava flow

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Lava flow ahead

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Clearest view of the day of Middle and North Sisters

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Fall colors

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Collier Cone – a future destination.

and back through the burn zone to the trailhead,

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which, after twelve miles for the day, I was very glad to see.

Sparse but welcome wildflowers today:

 

Dee Wright Observatory

We had to drive over Makenzie Pass to return to the town of Sisters at the end of the day, so we stopped for a quick overview:

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Dee Wright Observatory

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Belknap Craters and Mt Washington to the north.

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Cloud covered North and Middle Sisters to the south.

Late Summer Adventures Part 1 – Redwoods and Beaches (18-38)

We were looking forward to a long planned trip to Crater Lake and Mt Lassen, but with  forest fires and smoke in those areas, we rescheduled to Brookings and Sisters, keeping one of our Ashland days in the mix.

Ashland, Oregon  9/8/2018

It was smoky/hazy when we arrived in Ashland. We walked around downtown, including a stop at Websters, the yarn store, and a walk through Lithia Park. We had an early dinner at one of the restaurants along Lithia Creek, then saw the play ‘Snow In Midsummer’ at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. The story was a modernized Chinese tale about a woman who had been wronged and was seeking justice. Very well done and thought provoking regarding harm that descends through generations.

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The pond in Lithia Park, Ashland, Oregon

Darlingtonia, Redwoods and Whaleshead Beach   9/9/2018

The way to the southern Oregon Coast is through the redwood forests of Northern California. We stopped at Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park, first at the botanical trail where we viewed the Darlingtonia bog:

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Darlingtonia are carnivorous pitcher plants – they eat insects. This bog is one of the rare preserves for these plants.

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Next we took a short hike (#47) through Stout Grove along the middle fork of the Smith River.

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Then we drove north on Hwy 101 back into Oregon to our lodgings near Whales Head Beach. After dinner we took a long walk on the beach as the tide ebbed.

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Whalehead Island from the beach

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View south

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Ebb tide sand patterns

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Wind ripples

Boy Scout Tree Redwood Trail and Point St George, CA  9/10/2018

We saw a rainbow at Rainbow Rock while driving south this morning:

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Rainbow over Rainbow Rock

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Zoom in view of Rainbow Rock folds

We drove south into Jedediah Smith State Park again to hike the Boy Scout Tree Trail (#48). The forest is lined with oxalis and fern and it is awe inspiring to walk among these very tall, old beautiful trees.

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Dwarfed by trees

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The Boy Scout Tree

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Late Oxalis bloom

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The undersides of the oxalis leaves are this beautiful red violet color.

After our hike, we drove to the coast just north of Crescent City, to Point St George, where the tide was receding and we had a chance to explore the tide pools.

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Redwood flotsam

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sea anemones

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clam, anemones

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snails

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snail trails

Boardman Corridor Beaches  9/11/2018

We spent the day exploring the Samuel H. Boardman State Scenic Corridor, a series of viewpoints, short trails and beaches along the southern Oregon coast north of Brookings.

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Arch Rock

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Natural Bridges

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Whalehead Island

We took a longer hike at Cape Ferrelo (#49),

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and another low tide beach walk at sunset at Lone Ranch Beach.

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Knitting

I made progress on the back panel of the Ivy Lace Cardigan while traveling:

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Cloud Cap and Timberline Trail, Mt Hood, Oregon (18-37)

Eliot East Moraine and Timberline Trail High Point     8/31/18       (Hike#46)

We have hiked here a few times. This is our first time taking the Eliot East Moraine trail along the crest of the moraine.

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Once up the steep sandy ascent to the crest of the moraine, there is a fabulous view to the Eliot Glacier, and the glacial valley below, the entire way to the Cloud Cap Shelter.

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Mt Hood and the Eliot Glacier

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Looking east to the high desert

I enjoy zooming in on the textures, crevasses, and steep edges of the Eliot Glacier and the rocky exposed top of Mt Hood in late summer.

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The moraine trail joins the Timberline Trail near Cloud Cap Shelter:

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Approaching Cloud Cap Shelter.

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Cloud Cap Shelter; Cooper Spur and Mt Hood beyond.

After visiting the Cloud Cap Shelter we continued south on the Timberline trail, up and down the wrinkles of the mountains’ flank, to the 7300’ high point of the trail. Clouds intermittently floated across the top of Mt Hood. We could see the faraway peaks of Mt Adams, Rainier and Jefferson above the blanket of clouds in the distance.

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The only snowfield we crossed this year.

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North view to Mts Rainier and Adams

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South view to Mt Jefferson, Lamberson Butte and the Timberline Trail continuing south.

By the time we retraced our steps north, the clouds had diminished.

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Cloud Cap Shelter again.

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The high desert beyond the clouds

We saw a marmot on the Eliot Moraine, and a blue bird on the Timberline Trail.

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marmot

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blue bird on the rock, Mt Adams beyond

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Not many flowers.

The rusty, red and yellow fall hues are beginning to color the vegetation on the rocky alpine slopes.

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6 miles, 1600 feet.

Lookback:

I like to review my photos from previous hikes to compare conditions. There was a lot more snow during our hike a month earlier last year.

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Mt Hood from Timberline trail, August 31, 2018

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Mt Hood from Timberline trail, July 28, 2017

And a lot more flowers, and a better view of the distant mountains last year.

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August 31, 2018

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July 28, 2017 – lupine, Mt St Helens, Rainier and Adams

CRAFTING

I cast on another round washcloth, and I have been swatching the Song yarn, trying decide what to make with it.

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We walked through the Art In The Pearl street fair on Labor Day and admired the beautiful artwork. This piece, by artist Kathy Ross, I found especially inspiring.

Kathy Ross, Art In The Pearl, 9/18

Kathy Ross, artist, Art in the Pearl, Portland, Oregon, September 2018

 

Fringed Grass of Parnassus at Burnt Lake, Mt Hood, OR (18-36)

Burnt Lake Trail.    8-24-2018        (hike#45)

The Burnt Lake Trail on the west side of Mt Hood leads through a quiet green shady forest that was ravaged by wildfires over a hundred years ago – offering an interesting historical perspective on the present day fires. The trail climbs at a gentle gradient for the first 2.5 miles through second growth forest along the Lost Creek drainage. Sounds of water are never far.

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Green understory foliage includes a plethora of plants with white blooming spring flowers (trillium, vanilla leaf, inside-out, bunchberry, Solomon seals, lilies, oxalis).

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Today we only see the pops of color that are seeds and berries.

After crossing Lost Creek we pass several giant burned out trees – remnants from the Victorian era fire that burned this forest.

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The last mile of the trail is steeper, and traverses many creeks and springs with a few flowers still blooming – though red berry clusters of Devils club are the most noticeable color along the trail today.

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Fireweed and cloudy horizon

 

We drop down into Burnt Lake basin and are awed by the mist rising from the lake and roiling about on its surface while we walk the half mile shoreline trail.

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Although the promised reflection of Mt Hood eludes us, the misty atmosphere creates its own moment of grace. We sit quietly for our lunch break and hear a few fish jump, watch the concentric ripples expand and interrupt the reflections and mist patterns.

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Fading pink spirea line the lake shore path that leads past a small bog near the inlet where we see, for the first time for me, a wildflower called the Fringed Grass of Parnassus.

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Cascade Fringed Grass of Parnassus

Such an elegant name – it has been on my watch list. The flower heads were much bigger than I imagined, and deserve a great name! The white petals are indeed fringed elaborately and glow in the light. I am glad to have finally seen this flower!

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8.3 miles/1600 feet.

CRAFTING:

I finished another tortilla dishcloth

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I added some cross stitched foliage to Jane Austen’s house.

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I am still trying to decided what to cast on next…